Category: environment

Brazil’s Kayapo people rejected money from dam-building companies. “We have decided that we do not want a single penny of your dirty money… Our river does not have a price, our fish that we eat does not have a price, and the happiness of our grandchildren does not have a price.”  

Photo :  © Wilfred Paulse / Flickr 

In 2015, two Buddhists who bought £5,000 of live Crustacea and released them into the sea for good karma, were fined £15,000 for ‘untold damage’ to the environment by introducing non-native species.

Their ritual was performed in the belief that returning animals to the wild is good karma. But because the crustaceans were not native species, they threatened other marine life and government agencies had to spend thousands of pounds in an attempt to recapture the shellfish, offering fishermen a bounty to reel them in.

Scientist grew trees in a sealed biosphere and couldn’t work out why they fell over before they matured. They eventually figured out whilst they provided the perfect growing environment, it was lacking wind which provides the stress to ensure the trees grew strong enough to support themselves.  (source)

Photo :  DrStarbuck / Flickr / wikimedia

A couple decided to rebuild their deserted piece of land of 600 hectares in Aimorés, Brazil. They planted more than 2 million tree saplings. As a result, the site has 293 plant species, 172 bird species and 33 animal species, some of which were on the verge of extinction. Took 18 years.

Adidas has sold over 1 million eco-friendly shoes made from ocean plastic. Each pair reuses the equivalent of 11 plastic bottles.

Cigarette butts are environmentally toxic and the most littered item in the world.

Scientists have developed a technology that takes carbon from the atmosphere and combines it with hydrogen from the water to create a clean fuel. It is chemically identical to gasoline yet causes no pollution. It can be used in all gas, jet fuel, and diesel engines.

Australia has already started to test a network of drainage nets so that plastics and other pollutants do not reach rivers or sea.

In 2001, India started building roads that are held together using polymer glues made from shredded plastic wastes. These plastic roads have developed no potholes and cracks after years of use, and they are cheaper to build. As of 2016, there are more than 21,000 miles of plastic roads.

In 2001, India started building roads that are held together using polymer glues made from shredded plastic wastes. These plastic roads have developed no potholes and cracks after years of use, and they are cheaper to build. As of 2016, there are more than 21,000 miles of plastic roads.