Category: ww2

Dr Seuss drew anti-Japanese cartoons during WWII. When he met the survivors of Hiroshima, he realized “A person is a person no matter how small”. He later created Horton Hears a Who! as an apology, dedicating it to a Japanese friend.

The Soviet Union once tried to make a tank fly, a prototype was built and tested in 1942, but was found to be unworkable.

The Maharaja (Indian King) of Jamnagar took in and agreed to look after 1000 orphaned Polish children — Jews and Catholics alike — who faced an uncertain future during World War II. The Maharaja told the children, “You may not have your parents, but I am your father now.”

Vaclav Bozdech, a soldier in WWII, found a puppy while on the run and planned to kill it so its barking would not alert the Germans. Unable to bring himself to do so, he took it with him, and the dog later helped find survivors of an air raid and saved Bozdech’s life during the Cold War.

In 2014, an 89 year old WW2 veteran, Bernard Shaw went missing from his nursing home. It turned out that he went to Normandy for the 70th anniversary of D-Day landings against the nursing home’s orders. He left the home wearing a grey mack concealing the war medals on his jacket. (source)

The largest number of graves of any cemetery for U.S. personnel killed during World War II is located in Manila, Philippines. It has 17,206 graves. 16,636 of which were U.S. personnel.

There’s a cemetery in the Netherlands consisting of 8,300 US veterans who died in WWII. For the past 70 years, Dutch families have come to the cemetery every Sunday to care for a grave they adopted. Hundreds of people are currently on a waiting list to become caretakers.

Photo : U.S. Embassy The Hague / flickr

Medal of Honor recipient, Edward Carter, could speak five languages, fought in his first war at 15, and joined the Spanish Civil War to fight fascists at 20, before eventually fighting in WW2. Despite his heroism in combat, he and all other black awardees would not be recognized until 1997.

During WW2, the winner of the Tour de France, Gino Bartali, put his fame to a good cause. He hid counterfeit document in his bicycle and smuggled them through Nazi checkpoints. These documents saved over 800 Jews lives.

A Hungarian chemist during WWII hid his Nobel Prize by dissolving it in acid and leaving it on a shelf due to the Nazi ban on its citizens from accepting the Nobel Prize. After the war, he reconstituted the gold from the acid, returned it to Sweden, and got the medal cast again.

Photo : Adam Baker / Flickr